The Quotable


May you have:
A world of wishes at your command.
God and his angels close to hand.
Friends and family their love impart,
and Irish blessings in your heart!

~~Irish Blessing~~

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Deridens alium, non inderisus abibit...

Sanctuary, St. John the Baptist Church
3/28/2010


In my reading I sometimes go to the bookshelf and pick up a book I haven't perused in some time. Today I chose to open Latin Sayings for Spiritual Growth by Archabbot Lambert Reilly, O.S. B. from St. Meinrad Archabbey. What happened when I opened it was not so much surprising but relevant to the season of Holy Week.

If you are reflecting this week on the Passion of Our Lord then you will put yourself in the crowd. You will witness in the Holy Countenance the pain. You will hear the jeering crowd with its condemnation. You will see the sneering faces and the hear the verbal abuse of the Anointed One. I found this offering timely for me while on this journey and so I offer it for your reflection.

Deridens alium, non inderisus abibit
("The mocker doesn't go away unmocked")
Traditional

We live in an age of irony. Nothing, it seems is to be taken seriously, and certainly nothing is beyond the reach of mockery.

Satire and poking fun have their place, but when the tone of the ridicule and contempt hijacks an entire age and literally nothing is sacred, something is very wrong.

When we nurture the virtue of justice, we're aware that everything that God created has a divinely ordained purpose. We human beings may, in some ways, be ridiculous and hapless creatures, but when the laughter fades, here we stand: beloved children of God.

How do we deal with the flaws and foibles of those around us? Are they reasons for judgement or fun? Do we make any attempt to understand why people are the way they are or do we take the easy way out, blithely criticizing?

The question is, do we treat others as human beings or as objects for our amusement or sense of superiority?

And what happens the, when we look in the mirror? What has treating others unjustly, as less than human, done to our own humanity? (pp 170-171)
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I have wondered about those who stood at the foot of the cross and mocked Jesus, sneering and challenging him to save himself if he is God...When the earth quaked and the Temple veil is torn in half did they then realize he was the Messiah?

And so before I can pass judgment on these I must ask myself. "Do I, too, mock others for their beliefs, ridicule them for their traditions, treat them as less than myself because they don't "speak the language?" Why is it I become in sensed when I'm placing a call and am asked to choose #1 if I speak English and #2 if I speak another language. What in heaven's name causes me to be unkind? And why do I make remarks like, "If they live here they should learn the language." How do I know that they are not learning it? Who am I to judge. Why should the same offer of support be offered to them so that they might feel justified? Their life is certainly no less valuable in the eyes of God than mine! Shame on ME!

Jesus Christ did not die for those who spoke Aramaic. He didn't die for the Jewish people. We all know why and how he died. What we need to CONTINUE to learn is how I am to live the message for which he DID die, that we might live the Greatest Commandment. "You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your being, with all your strength, and with all our mind, and your neighbor as yourself." (Luke 10: 27) And then we must understand that when we live this law we too will find ourselves ridiculed, rebuffed, shunned, the brunt of jokes. I only pray that I will have the courage, by the power of the Holy Spirit, to deny the temptation to ridicule, humiliate, or injure others with my words. No unkind words came from the mouth of our Savior. They shouldn't come from mine either!

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Thanks be to God!

5 comments:

  1. Beautiful post, Carol, and one that I need to contemplate. I am so quick to judge, and one line that really sticks out for me is: "Do we treat others as human beings or as objects for our amusement...?"
    I know I am guilty of that!
    And also the impatience with which I treat others leaves much to be desired.
    Thank you for this post.
    All the best to you,
    Eileen

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  2. This has to be the single best thing that I have read on this Lenten journey. Fantastic, Cathy!

    Blessings,
    Abbey

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  3. HI KATHY

    WHEN I WAS IN GRADE SCHOOL...BACK IN THE DAY...LATIN WAS A REQUIRED LANGUAGE...AND OH HOW I LOVED IT.A FEW YEARS AGO...I STARTED MEMORIZING LATIN PHRASES...

    http://www.yuni.com/library/latin.html


    JUST MAKES ME FEEL SMARTER...


    YOUR ENTRY IS APPROPRIATE TO HOLY WEEK...WHEN WE REMEMBER HOW JESUS WAS SCORNED.

    I AM ALSO PONDERING ON OUR POPE AND THE WAY IN WHICH THIS SECULAR WORLD IS TRYING TO CRUCIFY HIM.PRAY FOR HIM AND THE WHOLE CHURCH.

    IN THIS UGLY WORLD,I SEE MY FAITH AND CHURCH AS THE ONLY REDEEMING BEACON.

    MAY THE LORD GIVE YOU HIS PEACE.

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  4. Cathy, I think many of us Catholics have spent reflecting this Holy Week, as we should. I had a full day of prayer and mediation today and had to accept a few unpleasant things about myself now I have to work on the changes.
    .......:-) Hugs

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  5. What a wonderful thought provoking and inspiring post.

    Thank you Cathy.

    God bless you.

    Dominus Vobiscum.

    ReplyDelete

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